BAsics discussions at OccupySF and OccupyOakland - "POLICE: 99% or Brutal Enforcers of a Brutal System?"

Saturday at Occupy Oakland, Oscar Grant Plaza (AKA Frank Ogawa) 3:30-5:30PM
Sunday at Occupy Oakland, Oscar Grant Plaza 1-3PM
Sunday at Occupy SF, Justin Herman Plaza (the bottom of Market Street) 4-6PM
Sunday discussions will be led by Larry Everest, writer for Revolution newspaper and author of
Oil, Power & Empire: Iraq and the U.S. Global Agenda.

Discussion circles with Revolution Books will be taking off from these quotes:
Police attacking OccupyOakland & gassing protestors (the 99%).
BAsics 1:24
The role of the police is not to serve and protect the people. It is to serve and protect the system that rules over the people. To enforce the relations of exploitation and oppression, the conditions of poverty, misery and degradation into which the system has cast people and is determined to keep people in. The law and order the police are about, with all of their brutality and murder, is the law and the order that enforces all this oppression and madness.

BAsics 1:21
You can think of this in terms of politics and the state: If you didn't have, not only laws but a state apparatus of repression with the armed forces, the police, the courts, the prisons, the bureaucracies, the administrative function—if you didn't have that, how would you maintain the basic economic relations of exploitation and the basic social relations that go along with that? How would you maintain the domination of men over women, the domination of certain nationalities or "races" over others, if you did not have a superstructure to enforce that, or if that superstructure—the politics, the ideology and culture that is promoted, the morality promoted among people—were out of alignment with those social and, fundamentally, those economic relations? Once again, you wouldn't be able to maintain the order, stability and functioning of the system.

This is fundamentally why a system of this kind cannot be reformed.
This goes back to the point that's in the Revolution talk2 about systems, and how they have certain dynamics and "rules." You can't just play any card you want in a card game or slap a domino down any time you want, anywhere you want, because the whole thing will come unraveled. And you can't have, as any significant phenomenon, cooperative economic relations in a system that operates on the dynamics of commodity production and exchange in which labor power itself, the ability to work, is a commodity.

A lot of reformist social democrats will talk in these terms: "Let's have real democracy in the superstructure" (they don't generally use terms like "superstructure," but that's the essence of what they mean) "and then," they'll say, "on that basis let's 'democratize' the economy." What would happen if you tried to implement this "democratization" of the economic base? That economic base would still be operating on the basis of, would still be driven by, the anarchy of commodity production and exchange in which, once again, labor power is also a commodity—in fact, the most basic commodity in capitalist relations and capitalist society—and soon your "democratization" of the economy would completely break down, because the dynamics of commodity production and exchange would mean that some would fare better than others, some would beat out others—plus you have the whole international arena where all this would be going on.

The two quotes above are taken from

BAsics, from the talks and writings of Bob Avakian
"You can't change the world if you don't know the BAsics."

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